• Simple Item 5
  • Simple Item 4
  • Simple Item 6
  • Simple Item 3
  • Simple Item 1
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Innovation Center's Letter, November 19, 2018

Publications

https://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/pub-details/?pubid=42892">Rural Veterans find themselves in a better employment position today than they did in the years following the Great Recession.
The unemployment rate for rural veterans has declined since peaking at 10.3 percent in 2010. In 2017, it stood at 4.6 percent, its lowest rate in the last decade. The unemployment rate for young rural veterans (ages 18 to 34) has seen a large decline too—from a high of 15.7 percent in 2009 to 7.1 percent in 2017. Young transitioning veterans can face high unemployment due to service-related disability or a lack of civilian work experience, which become greater obstacles when the economy is weak. Although the post-recession national economic upturn is driving a drop-in unemployment for all veterans, a concerted national effort to hire veterans also appears to be helping close the employment gap for young veterans. This chart provides an update to the ERS report, https://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/pub-details/?pubid=42892">Rural Veterans at a Glance.

https://www.cdc.gov/cpr/readiness/hurricane_messages.htm">Preparedness and Safety Messaging for Hurricanes, Flooding, and Similar Disasters
CDC developed a reference document that contains key messages on hurricane and flood related health threats. The right message at the right time from the right person can save lives. Every natural disaster is unique and emergency responders must quickly adapt to the ever-changing nature of a crisis. To be able to more quickly and effectively disseminate messages before, during, and after an emergency, many key messages can be written in the preparedness phase. The https://www.cdc.gov/cpr/readiness/00_docs/CDC_Hurricanes_PreparednessSafetyMessaging_July2018_508.pdf">Preparedness and Safety Messaging for Hurricanes, Flooding, and Similar Disasters (https://www.cdc.gov/cpr/readiness/00_docs/CDC_Hurricane_PreparednessSafetyMessaging_July2018_Spanish_508.pdf">Spanish) can help local responders quickly create and adapt health communication products for affected communities. The document contains messages on various topics including food safety, carbon monoxide poisoning, waterborne diseases, and mold.

https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2018/november/educational-attainment-a-key-factor-in-rural-patient-uptake-of-telehealth-activities/">Educational Attainment a Key Factor in Rural Patient Uptake of Telehealth Activities
Compared to traditional medical delivery systems, telehealth allows people to actively participate in health care activities timelier and with improved convenience. An https://www.ers.usda.gov/">ERS study found that education is strongly associated with telehealth participation, which increased with each successively higher level of educational attainment in 2015.

https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/updates/forward?utm_source=racupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=update103118&item=27801&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.usda.gov%2Fmedia%2Fpress-releases%2F2018%2F10%2F30%2Fusda-and-ondcp-unveil-latest-tool-help-rural-communities-address&k=6StBW">USDA and ONDCP Unveil Latest Tool to Help Rural Communities Address the Opioid Epidemic White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) Deputy Director Jim Carroll and U.S. Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary for Rural Development Anne Hazlett have unveiled a listing of Federal programs that can be used to build resilient communities and address opioid misuse in rural communities. The https://www.rd.usda.gov/files/RuralResourceGuide.pdf">Rural Resource Guide to Help Communities Address Substance Use Disorder and Opioid Misuse (PDF, 1.7 MB) is a first-of-its-kind, one-stop-shop for rural leaders looking for Federal funding and partnership opportunities. The departments and agencies represented on the Rural Opioid Federal Interagency Working Group include the Departments of Commerce, Education, Health and Human Services, Housing, Justice, Labor, Transportation, and Veterans Affairs; the Corporation for National and Community Service; and the Appalachian Regional Commission. USDA launched the https://opioidmisusetool.norc.org/">Community Assessment Tool, an interactive database to help community leaders assess how and why the opioid epidemic is impacting their regions. USDA’s Community Opioid Misuse Toolbox is free and available to the public. It can be accessed on https://www.usda.gov/opioids">USDA’s Rural Opioid Misuse Webpage.

https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/toolkits/rural-toolkit">Rural Community Health Toolkit
Rural Community Health Toolkit. This toolkit provides rural communities with the information, resources, and materials they need to develop a community health program in a rural community. Each of the toolkit's six modules contains information that communities can apply to develop a rural health program, regardless of the specific health topic the program addresses. The toolkit also links to https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/toolkits">issue-specific toolkits for more in-depth information.

Events and Learning

https://chrr.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_hJVrY2a3QzyUQIPblyZtPA">“Partnering with Community” a webinar sponsored by County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, In 2017, Allen County, Kansas was recognized for their community transformation with a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. At the heart of a communities’ efforts to improve health, is a commitment to authentically engage and partner with the community’s best asset – its people. Allen County offers an example of how a community working together to harness the collective power of leaders, partners, and residents can create the conditions to give everyone a fair and just opportunity for health. For a sneak peek, watch a short video https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jj/">here. To register for the webinar, click https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jt/">here. Held November 20, 2018, at 3:00 PM EST.

https://www.usda.gov/topics/rural/rural-development-innovation-center">Rural Energy Savings Program and Manufactured Housing Roundtable
USDA Rural Development solicits input from its partners to expand access to capital, improve effective and efficient delivery of programs. The Rural Energy Savings Program (RESP) provides funding to electric service providers for re-lending to consumers and small businesses implementing energy efficiency measures. This 2014 Farm Bill program will help lower energy bills for rural families and businesses. Recent changes through the Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2018 authorized RESP funding, for the first time, to be used to replace manufactured housing units with more energy efficient units to result in energy savings. Please join us at a USDA RD RESP and Manufactured Housing Roundtable. This round table is designed to solicit comments, ideas, and input related to the RESP program in general, and especially related to the implementation of the manufactured housing will enlighten USDA leadership and help ensure seamless program delivery. RD solicits input from its partners as we work together to expand access to capital, improve effective and efficient delivery of programs—and most importantly—facilitate rural prosperity and economic development.

  • To attend you must contact the USDA Rural Development Innovation Center at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by COB Wednesday, November 21, 2018. (Once confirmed, agenda, directions, and other additional information will be provided)
  • Event Date: November 27, 2018 Time: 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. | Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Location: U.S. Department of Agriculture Jamie L. Whitten Building 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, D.C. Registration is required. (This is a live event).

https://cc.readytalk.com/registration/#/?meeting=5jwe0xa4al5z&campaign=f8iq2x56d289">Webinar on Inclusive Development in Opportunity Zones On November 26, 2018, from 3PM-4PM ET, the Aspen Institute in partnership with the Rockefeller Foundation present a webinar on:  http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001cfDu4L7lb7LcySj5ZcgYHU3biP5V2d5QFCdUUUgsv52keiezFVBLCERTW0iJaym-_zDgq2XcwRQVgYNQA4IffVydhCikZ_yNthSBEUAV9yLFMTkhHtYl4E85ovbzkBazt7ZXRPQb3jekmrBqckBZLB8AmNBLXUS0wFmTeoa7a8A2U6Gfz5_9Ng==&c=DhgazPPwL6-CYqdDdLTVvijCfzXSIGEFLtPC4rpxuqT0qWpgeHTcPA==&ch=GpV5H63LvpX7Gjqm6O9RnmHrsoXgC1zHrClWycRgOul8SyfA7On_zA==">Expanding inclusive development through employee ownership in opportunity zones. If your organization has been thinking about whether and how Opportunity Zones might achieve the goals of economic transformation in communities that have been left out of American prosperity, http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001cfDu4L7lb7LcySj5ZcgYHU3biP5V2d5QFCdUUUgsv52keiezFVBLCERTW0iJaym-_zDgq2XcwRQVgYNQA4IffVydhCikZ_yNthSBEUAV9yLFMTkhHtYl4E85ovbzkBazt7ZXRPQb3jekmrBqckBZLB8AmNBLXUS0wFmTeoa7a8A2U6Gfz5_9Ng==&c=DhgazPPwL6-CYqdDdLTVvijCfzXSIGEFLtPC4rpxuqT0qWpgeHTcPA==&ch=GpV5H63LvpX7Gjqm6O9RnmHrsoXgC1zHrClWycRgOul8SyfA7On_zA==">join the Aspen Institute to learn why employee ownership is a central part of an inclusive development strategy.https://cc.readytalk.com/registration/#/?meeting=5jwe0xa4al5z&campaign=f8iq2x56d289"> Click here for a Registration link. http://www.canr.msu.edu/ncrcrd/uploads/Quinoes%20RHSE%20Dec%207.pdf">Purdue Extension and the North Central Regional Center for Rural Development Join them for this free webinar “Dreamland: America's Opiate Epidemic and How We Got Here,” presented by Sam Quinones, journalist and author on December 7, 2018 at 2:00 PM EST.

To join, click https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jd/">here.  

https://www.cms.gov/newsroom/press-releases/cms-announces-new-medicaid-demonstration-opportunity-expand-mental-health-treatment-services">New Medicaid Demonstration Opportunity to Expand Mental Health Treatment Services 
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced existing and new opportunities for states to design innovative service delivery systems for adults with serious mental illness (SMI) and children with serious emotional disturbance (SED). This includes the ability for states to receive authority to pay for short-term resident treatment services in an institution for mental disease (IMD). Source: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/news/27858">view details. https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/">Broadband USA Webinar Series The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) continues to host a series of webinars to engage the public and stakeholders with information to accelerate broadband connectivity, improve digital inclusion, strengthen policies and support local priorities. The Practical Broadband Conversations webinar series will provide an ongoing source of information including broadband deployment, digital inclusion, workforce skills, and e-government. https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/">BroadbandUSA will hold the webinars from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time on the third Wednesday of every month through September 18, 2019.

https://vimeo.com/300425240">“Strategies to Support Economic Diversification” Webinar Tutorial
Presented by https://www.nado.org/about/">The National Association of Development Organizations (NADO). This free webinar covers planning for economic diversification to explore through http://www.cedscentral.com/">Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy. NADO notes: “Economic diversification helps support https://www.cedscentral.com/resilience.html">regional resilience, a concept that should be woven into all aspects of your CEDS and can serve as a guiding framework for how your district approaches regional planning and economic development. Regions and communities that diversify their economies are much better positioned to face a mix of inevitable future shocks and disruptions.”

https://www.investinwork.org/book">Investing in America's Workforce: Improving Outcomes for Workers and Employers.
Explore contemporary research, best practices, and resources in this book. The book is divided https://www.investinwork.org/book">into three volumes: Investing in Workers, Investing in Work, and Investing in Systems for Employment Opportunity. Each volume highlights workforce development programs and/or policies supporting positive investments.  

Innovation Center's Letter, November 6, 2018

Publications

http://www.hpj.com/ag_news/usda-combating-the-opioid-crisis-in-rural-america/article_66943be6-df87-11e8-9c3a-0f17c3a37f75.html">USDA combating the opioid crisis in rural America
By Assistant to the Secretary for Rural Development Anne Hazlett | High Plains Journal

In small towns from the heartland to the coasts, there is a growing threat to economic prosperity in rural America: the misuse of prescription pain medicine, otherwise known as opioids, and other addictive substances. Our nation is in the midst of a crisis. While no corner of the country has gone untouched by this epidemic, rural communities like Garden Plain, a farm town of just 890 people in south central Kansas, have been particularly hard hit. In October of last year, President Donald J. Trump declared war on the opioid epidemic and directed an all-hands team to respond with every available resource. With that call to action, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue ensured the United States Department of Agriculture is on the front lines of this crisis as a committed partner to rural communities. As we carry out our core mission of increasing rural prosperity, the opioid epidemic and the broader issue of substance misuse in rural America is more than a health issue; this is a matter of rural prosperity that threatens the economic fabric of small towns across our country.

https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/updates/forward?utm_source=racupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=update103118&item=27801&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.usda.gov%2Fmedia%2Fpress-releases%2F2018%2F10%2F30%2Fusda-and-ondcp-unveil-latest-tool-help-rural-communities-address&k=6StBW">USDA and ONDCP Unveil Latest Tool to Help Rural Communities Address the Opioid Epidemic
The U.S. Department of Agriculture and the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) have released the https://www.rd.usda.gov/files/RuralResourceGuide.pdf">Rural Resource Guide to Help Communities Address Substance Use Disorder and Opioid Misuse, a list of federal programs that can be used to build resilient communities and address opioid misuse in rural areas.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0019kR_iJCz-Wh3ZycHGnKdIjQVXL_GnGYfacjpykSTl_EgbbJqyFXfKGUAkkzaBlSfyDlvmg68BwE9d9Zf7T_z4hqCblPQJNrl82LlvGLYgSj0XyUfZH9__t8YsPkVKfiWeVm8NHUA8vYBGCikyjqFeJ5Y0XKQYPE2OvFNrMlFayfK0EJj_JR7rzHTQ-I58mW3qb-1So9-A_V6LeoKkhuBYmwSJoCCaqVRRsOnxEONT6WMzknqBD5tU9vcEe4Ndt7uwQBA_w3LpgA3UB3JNOPh2g==&c=VttDwe12hVN8OmShf-CoeI8rSXlRuSFy1_tz4orgH3Uf3d4UyLLkKQ==&ch=I6ZZecxJQH5N4fkApPZg6eMEl-MYB_vZcLczJj2RAM1Ne4tITMv4pg==">Rural education levels are increasing, but still lag behind urban areas
Although the overall educational attainment of rural adults has increased markedly over time, the share of adults with at least a bachelor’s degree is still higher in urban areas. Between 2000 and 2016, the share of urban adults with a bachelor’s degree or higher grew from 26 percent to 33 percent, while in rural areas the share grew from 15 percent to 19 percent. This gap may be partly due to the higher pay premiums offered in urban areas to workers with college degrees. Also, between 2000 and 2016, the share of rural adults with less than a high school diploma or equivalent decreased from 24 percent to 14 percent. That decline closed the rural-urban gap in high school completion rates: over the same period, the share of urban adults without a high school degree or equivalent fell from 19 percent to 12 percent.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001uJyIiXdlZI5iEae1goYe1ZFoSE215Et6uoAaeSRrKDTzoSWYIl0BXrKSsCYoiHl_jzCAzy3rwFpfqQA7Rs0UifPMQGtD3ay71H6mWJR-jwYf0OziIYyHT-uAaI2Q68UdBMZOAgVQQtnwFLY_AuX3M7peKN0VfabZYwInpN9iV6SYsiZs6GwEdog60WQBM-9gT3w2gDhFlHmqt5df_Af1lL8l0YUMhmxjfPbG38WS8iru4AjwGC6H_l5scjD4wUqgR5aZiTBNaxRQ_xdsgINXQA==&c=T8lgApETHmUWYakkMBF8vXgSm2w5l_3vJ9sQunyAjC-iHyQdQW4aZA==&ch=cTLd6o-hHCRqHY35c4Bzn8uzB2h4_wcB2ii0eWhkUZDdfOBrml8MVQ==">Prevalence of food insecurity varied by household characteristics in 2017
While the majority of U.S. households are food secure, a minority experience food insecurity at times during the year, meaning their access to adequate food for active, healthy living is limited by a lack of money or other resources. Some households experience very low food security, a more severe range of food insecurity, where the food intake of one or more household members is reduced and normal eating patterns are disrupted. Food insecurity includes both very low food security and low food security. In 2017, 11.8 percent of all U.S households were food insecure. The prevalence of food insecurity was substantially higher for low-income households; 36.8 percent of households with incomes below the Federal poverty line were food insecure. Among all U.S. households, food insecurity rates were the highest for single-mother households (30.3 percent) and lowest for multiple-adult households with no children (7.7 percent).

Events and Learning

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/7387708080548459522">November Restoring Neighborhoods Task Force webinar
National Housing Coalition will host the November Restoring Neighborhoods Task Force webinar November 7, 2018 at 2:00PM EST.  The webinar will feature Alan Mallach of the Center for Community Progress discussing his report, https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-yh/">“The Empty House Next Door.” The report explores vacancy by defining what is meant by a “vacant” property, what constitutes a “healthy” vacancy rate, how vacant properties are measured and why properties become vacant and abandoned.

https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jl/">Going Big in Small Places: Millennials Make Their Mark in America’s Towns
A webinar “Going Big in Small Places: Millennials Make Their Mark in America’s Towns” which is part of the Orton Family Foundation’s series, “Heart & Soul Talks” will be held November 14, 2018 at 1:00 PM EST. The Daily Yonder is a co-sponsor of the webinar, along with the Citizen’s Institute for Rural Design. Ben Winchester, senior research fellow, University of Minnesota Extension, Center for Community Vitality, will be joined three Millennials who are finding opportunity and community in small towns and rural areas – Whitney Kimball Coe of Athens, Tennessee, Brittany Grimes of Galesburg, Illinois, and Bree Henderson of Laconia, New Hampshire.

https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jr/">How to Do Creative Placemaking Webinar Series
National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) has announced the “How to Do Creative Placemaking” webinar series, hosted in partnership with Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC), and supported by the NEA and The Kresge Foundation. Beginning in November 2018 and continuing through the spring of 2019, six monthly webinars will offer practical advice to help local practitioners meet the challenges of collaborative creative placemaking work. The first webinar in the series, Setting the Table: Developing Partnerships & Shared Values, takes place on Wednesday, November 14, 2019 at 2:00 PM EST and features Julie Garreau, executive director of Cheyenne River Youth Project.

https://www.workforcegps.org/events/2018/10/23/13/18/Our-Journey-Together-Work-Experiences-in-Rural-Areas-Corps-and-Workforce-Partnerships">Our Journey Together, Work Experiences in Rural Areas: Corps and Workforce Partnerships
The Division of Youth Services’ technical assistance (TA) series, Our Journey Together, provides support to workforce system professionals across the nation operating Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) youth programs.  This webinar will focus on rural work experiences for WIOA Youth program participants through a corps model. November 19 | 2:00PM – 3:30PM EST

https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jt/">Partnering With Community Webinar
“Partnering With Community” a webinar sponsored by County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, will be held November 20, 2018, at 3:00 PM EST. In 2017, Allen County, Kansas was recognized for their community transformation with a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize. At the heart of a communities’ efforts to improve health, is a commitment to authentically engage and partner with the community’s best asset – its people. Allen County offers an example of how a community working together to harness the collective power of leaders, partners, and residents can create the conditions to give everyone a fair and just opportunity for health. For a sneak peek, watch a short video https://rurallisc.cmail19.com/t/r-l-jjuljihy-hikdlkyuih-jj/">here.

https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/">Broadband USA Webinar Series
The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), as part of its BroadbandUSA program, will host a series of webinars on a monthly basis to engage the public and stakeholders with information to accelerate broadband connectivity, improve digital inclusion, strengthen policies and support local priorities. The Practical Broadband Conversations webinar series will provide an ongoing source of information on a range of topics and issues being addressed by BroadbandUSA, including but not limited to best practices for improving broadband deployment, digital inclusion, workforce skills, and e-government. BroadbandUSA will hold the webinars from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time on the third Wednesday of every month, beginning October 17, 2018 and continuing through September 18, 2019. NTIA will post the registration information on its BroadbandUSA website under Events.

Rural Development Innovation Center letter, October 5, 2018

Publications

https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/library/publications/2018/demo/p60-263.pdf">Income and Poverty in the United States: 2017
“Income and Poverty in the United States: 2017” is a report from the U.S. Census Bureau that discusses income levels and the number of people in poverty for 2016 and 2017, along with the percent change from 2016 to 2017. It includes statistics for metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas (see Table 1 and Table 3). The report is based on data from the 2018 and earlier Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements.

https://addiction.surgeongeneral.gov/sites/default/files/Spotlight-on-Opioids_09192018.pdf">Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Spotlight on Opioids
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has released “Facing Addiction in America: The Surgeon General's Spotlight on Opioids.” The report provides data on prevalence of substance use, and opioid misuse, use disorders, overdoses, and related topics, as well as a discussion of prevention programs and screening.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=0011KvmiGyUSKmHuoC92jQL7GfmA-mrn-XV8sea594Nixe31DqNQUBsQmeixWqrU6JQOiFXsATHFeUFUyFZTaHsAvLKVfTBAYwNP4PiQaDopqeka2-16IDKjVUV6zHNGVsF50rsF3TCIxLjcLJG63ZMc9JAGVbr_OjKvUnGghzK6DjI3qK2oabKH8fj1KWK0EbL_GHtX3PYOA-XHspJmym2-kifC2rkd9vw2qGA1qvum0az8VuKyW24cAeklbma8Pvi0oCOx4oF7Zz6hD8hfHWd7w==&c=LKXdNIX5d0JqjsbLA92my6d0oAGd1FsDl6gnGujkKnDRaNzF6lhFsQ==&ch=QZqLA4DSAR1i_Qr5vOT1X9wEa9Vg5pOFRaPGxm_gtiAE_z54Q1s1Ww==">Percent of residents participating in SNAP varies across States
The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)—USDA’s largest food assistance program—provided assistance to 42 million low-income individuals in the United States in 2017. These individuals accounted for 12.9 percent of the U.S. population, down from 13.7 percent in 2016. The share of Americans participating in SNAP has declined each year since 15.1 percent participated in 2013. In 2017, the State shares of residents receiving SNAP benefits ranged from 22.1 percent in New Mexico to 5.7 percent in Wyoming. Differences in the State shares reflect differences in economic conditions, need, and program policies. Among seven FNS-defined regions nationwide, in 2017, the Southeast region had the highest average share of residents receiving SNAP benefits at 15.1 percent, and the Mountain Plains region had the lowest average share of residents receiving SNAP at 9.6 percent.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001E11gl1QIaX8u8RO8FpvIVUJH5UDejWVOL6F__BFife5K5NxgbqNp2i1pJUCdZ9lXUOyy_HANRmW47oyF7gwxFeiEqfnM94AfuyTstDC-pUN3fwHOR0D8Su7fyeoROtjlV1zo4xS_ED21Hw3hOiM8Eol2lU3LcJ9TZXt7wa7bYzhxcB0qcrvq07pHxhJnCMCjeTx8dIxnMgZrM2oNALxl8mL_2jMyUb0EyRHdiZ7Ac5q0f2uWgKcHeEp4sNqfnqJ9puJYiOSWCCfULKc6VZlWdQ==&c=m47w0EYQFPJxs6rDStSYBUPbUm5nLYu_5A1IOtIc4onqqe17GU-rlA==&ch=AVKq7TZWppWkGLLx_pLnSsxgVuiTF_CXsb8AqoEkp0MOJmCCcRg1TQ==">U.S. spending on food away from home continued to outpace food-at-home spending in 2017
U.S. consumers, businesses, and government entities spent $1.62 trillion on food and beverages in 2017. Spending at food-away-from-home establishments—restaurants, school cafeterias, sports venues, and other eating places—accounted for 53.8 percent of these expenditures, and the remaining 46.2 percent took place at grocery stores, supercenters, convenience stores, and other retailers. A 53.8-percent share of food expenditures does not equate to 53.8 percent of food quantities, as food purchased away from home is generally higher priced than food prepared at home. Food-away-from-home outlets incur costs for the workers required to prepare and serve food, as well as for buildings, equipment, and utilities. The away-from-home market, which accounted for about one-third of total food expenditures 50 years ago, saw its share grow through the decades, except in some recession years. During the 2007-09 recession, food away from home’s share of total food spending stayed at or just below 50 percent before surpassing its pre-recession share by rising to 50.2 percent in 2010 and continuing to grow to its 2017 share of 53.8 percent.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001X-BjlVMruqjsRBHaBR557LSEi-NeSit-y_pQNCZuAI3QSBmS-S6mnf4khsAkZJ4vyYqzkkprtsauzCkgH0Qu_bfrRTM9rwWzUjrCRO3uyqEX0C1_E-HU2dTooeXxa_2-AbI8zl8yHHJH-SvKBDO2seTmUH_jjJBq4IB2HmlKXb4mysPhb98DbiIAaevdqVzanhxpVnwrMYOguG11gvIDg0a6oRghmxAJ-bASiubkBYwINizJEA5pniaqw6iqBZTA8Kui1a5s11TelN_2n2BTAQ==&c=XSDtjJwfAFSnZoVlXBHO7xim9fPmtvvlasJtI7cTWwbsC_tVQnc28g==&ch=JgnVA9dhn8SDCVAUKYYzWWofMvPkXi2fy8_u7V0BtdFE6ejPpjq-_g==">North Carolina, recently affected by Hurricane Florence, accounted for an estimated 3 percent ($11 billion) of U.S. farm sector cash receipts in 2017
Each August, as part of the its Farm Income data product, ERS produces estimates of the prior year’s farm sector cash receipts—the cash income the sector receives from agricultural commodity sales. State-level estimates provide background information about States subject to unexpected changes that affect the agricultural sector, such as the recent hurricane that struck North Carolina and surrounding States. In 2017, cash receipts for all U.S. farm commodities totaled $374 billion. North Carolina contributed about 3 percent ($11 billion) of that total, ranking eighth among all States. Broilers (chickens that are raised for meat) accounted for the largest share of cash receipts in North Carolina at 31 percent ($4 billion), compared to 12 percent nationwide—followed by hogs at 21 percent ($2 billion), compared to 11 percent nationwide. The State ranked third in the nation in cash receipts for both broilers and hogs. North Carolina led the country in cash receipts from tobacco, sweet potatoes, and turkeys—accounting for 50, 47, and 15 percent of the U.S. total for those commodities, respectively—although they contributed a smaller share of the State’s total cash receipts.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001AptESREiq3aBrokBviZTV1iZOFUvjBNLFUxY1P5AqufsKK0YBHCFp8Bv7hTWSUsZRg9HKxEg1lwi1hp0iYD2HJGEGPFxH0Uz9DO2SG2kXhFYSoA4XlyDkV2RbVWBkOXubZhKndUAFMtn0g2dZU4ZSJr5Y71RAe72efLowMG6ZxF_CKnQePrquMp2uzrFPf4b0wlDOcC8sbilakVbYK59Tao6rL9wWW3wFIA0ZTDes6vnWBDER0D8vc9IeTBh1b4AI-bciy2sbDfMgxmv6hph4Q==&c=j9TwZ-ICQNZAFC4Wql-NvirYwO9qI5qd8DndsfFcqa1I5EqSL9I1Qg==&ch=GnD_ePuQi78wC8eaRPeyN3tuX7M42KSk8VUuq9uatltUIuytHo8khg==">Districts with high-poverty schools generally make greater use of USDA’s Community Eligibility Provision for school meals
The Community Eligibility Provision (CEP) allows eligible schools in high-poverty areas to offer free USDA school meals to all students. Eligibility to use CEP is based on the share of students participating in specified income-based assistance programs—known as the Identified Student Percentage (ISP). Schools are eligible to use CEP if the ISP for the school, group of schools, or district is at least 40 percent. ERS researchers used administrative data from USDA and States for the 2015-16 school year to group eligible school districts into categories based on the highest school-level ISP in the district. The researchers found that more than half of districts with schools in ISP ranges between 61 and 90 percent used CEP in at least one of their schools. Under CEP, USDA reimburses schools at the higher free-meal rates for a portion of the meals served, and the remaining meals are reimbursed at the lower paid-meal rates. At ISP levels above 62.5 percent, all meals are reimbursed at the free rates. This reimbursement schedule likely contributes to districts with schools with higher needs making greater use of CEP. However, districts that have schools with ISP levels of 91-100 percent had a lower CEP adoption rate. Some districts may have felt less need to adopt CEP because so many children’s eligibility for free meals was already established through participation in other programs.

Events and Learning

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_40jRvXrIS-mRFni0GS3igw">Community Centered Revitalization: Community Capital, Opportunity Funds, and Local Control
Cutting Edge Capital is offering a webinar, “Community Centered Revitalization: Community Capital, Opportunity Funds, and Local Control,” on October 11, 2018, 2:00 PM EDT. Speakers will discuss how communities can come together to drive local revitalization in a way that benefits the community itself rather than outside investors.

https://www.ruralhealthinfo.org/webinars/nchs-obesity?utm_source=racupdate&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=update092618">Rural Insights on Adult and Youth Obesity, a National and Community-based Perspective
Rural Health Information Hub is offering a webinar on October 11, 2018 at 2:00 PM EDT with the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on adult and youth obesity in rural areas. Featured speakers include Kendra B. McDow and Craig Hales from the Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys at the NCHS and Shelby Polk from Delta State University.

https://broadbandusa.ntia.doc.gov/">Broadband USA Webinar Series
The National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), as part of its BroadbandUSA program, will host a series of webinars on a monthly basis to engage the public and stakeholders with information to accelerate broadband connectivity, improve digital inclusion, strengthen policies and support local priorities. The Practical Broadband Conversations webinar series will provide an ongoing source of information on a range of topics and issues being addressed by BroadbandUSA, including but not limited to best practices for improving broadband deployment, digital inclusion, workforce skills, and e-government. BroadbandUSA will hold the webinars from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Eastern Time on the third Wednesday of every month, beginning October 17, 2018 and continuing through September 18, 2019. NTIA will post the registration information on its BroadbandUSA website under Events.

https://www.giaging.org/news-events/tester/?_cldee=c2ZlbHprZUBsaXNjLm9yZw%3d%3d&recipientid=contact-121b5ca7f822e811813be0071b671021-7ade15745dd34da680921f460f3ee413&esid=1b1da214-ffbc-e811-818f-e0071b6af151">Geriatric Emergency Departments: Past, Present, and Future Opportunities for Engagement
Grantmakers in Aging will hold a webinar, “Geriatric Emergency Departments: Past, Present, and Future Opportunities for Engagement,” Monday, October 29, 2018, 2:00-3:00 PM EDT. The Emergency Department (ED) is often the point of entry for older adults into the healthcare system, and plays a unique role in setting the trajectory of care for this rapidly growing and often vulnerable segment of the population. ED visits by older adults increased 24.5% from 2001 to 2009, and annually there is nearly 1 ED visit for every 2 older Americans. To that end, the ED is increasingly leveraged as the “front porch” bridging the community to health systems, and outpatient to inpatient care.

Suzette's Letter, August 7, 2018

Publications

New! https://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/topic_files/USDARD/USDARD_884/2018/08/03/file_attachments/1049627/USDA%2BPrograms%2Bin%2Bthe%2BLocal%2BFood%2BSupply%2BChain%2B-%2BFINAL__1049627.PDF">Local Food Supply Chain Flyer
Producers and USDA partners can now find and access USDA resources electronically with the interactive Local Food Supply Chain flyer. This resource helps refer individuals to programs and funding sources across USDA. Resources are relevant to those interested in selling direct to consumers, local institutions, retailers, or distributors who plan to market the food as locally-raised or -grown to meet increasing consumer demand for local food.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001QwVMyypPxKe05VPCfIzpusPhi71bN87sZ_0bk1Y2JDcI3myhn2lZnxScCCR8oYDBjeMdh502HGTaRJNTLpw_kVydLRYOpO1BtTpqhnh8ISkwDnGfvHw1am8zW8rzkP5QNzffNpgWLV9xrXgpXUH3i2q9MSI56KxKRhvFOQlVigGjy0KsBQq3PEk4jyZU9bdyVQugq8scfkuS7DlpqoQUCeb8tRmzDQ6a-L4322Sb6WOYwVHUoZpdv5kW9Y9GZbYGNI5sRc1lJaq5iI5n6aBYvA==&c=9CVg3nICdruqtLfjwhPAC8_swuPg3qxeu6xkDzi3YET9WKRIiSOAkQ==&ch=QKu5Lc_Gt3sVboAqGJ9OTtqJnSV3E5no-v1MFc6UvKMfIqbZal6p5w==">Including asset appreciation and tax-loss benefits raises average farm household economic returns for all types of farms 
Of the roughly 2 million U.S. farm households, more than half report negative income from their farming operations each year. Most farms are small, and the proportion incurring farm losses is higher for households operating smaller farms—where most or all of their income is typically derived from off-farm activities. However, many households offset their off-farm income with these farm losses, thus reducing their taxable income. Also, in many years, farm real estate values have increased, which bolsters the economic returns for farmland owners. When these tax-loss benefits and changes in farm real estate values are taken into consideration, the returns to farming increased in 2015. For example, for residence farm households, estimated average returns increased from a negative $2,241 to positive $13,619. The increases in average returns for intermediate and commercial farm households were even greater. Finally, the share of total farm households with positive returns from their farm operation rose from 43 percent to 70 percent, primarily due to the broad increases in farmland real estate prices in 2015.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001HznG-C-AUL4CPvwGm_xC6QDJPS5gcktRdkCnvop1mG1obSZDQ5Io4Q04sZhE4mZWNWQLDymWaIDOv0-HorDs4q7itMTuexElqiv7SoYNN4SpY5HB9OJJKXbMbZ_0ehORire_8dall-pS2K43tc0mT1rHOSfS2ljeXIs2m25kp4ybXzyYtAn44rmil5GCTwt3H70sl7fj2kp1q8j9e50MPkg9hYXRbCi6nTUpo8erDYCNzKwbVPlszxoDSEcH3KugvWDTYdIkxV1_fVCReFhctA==&c=7HDW_CdWlqsdOoUbPoU5OuHQtt34JAAlAAkyKcw8HdNX1P1_RsSk6A==&ch=WeTIRjvj7gM1lPnHKiM9DxeG8l82iMd6ewGqqnrcklRHUPyccNQrWw==">Although farm wages have increased, labor costs as a share of farm gross cash income remained relatively flat 
Farm wages have risen since 2000, reaching an annual average of $13.32 per hour in 2017. However, farm labor costs as a share of farm gross cash income do not show an upward trend over 2000-16, as rising wage rates for farm workers have been offset by a number of factors, including rising labor productivity and output prices for some commodities. For all farms, labor costs averaged 10.1 percent of gross cash income in 2016, compared to 10.6 percent in 2000. For the more labor-intensive fruit, vegetable, and horticulture operations, labor costs in 2016 amounted to 26.7 percent of gross cash income, compared to 28.6 percent in 2000. For farms specializing in dairy, the labor cost share of gross cash income was 10.2 percent in 2016, compared to 9.5 percent in 2000.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001QJF_RHzyM9G9bzuLGK_bBJnceNT5KdVbL0lTuMBa6sln2rSTKMOfYnXbXSLCfLTcQGuy5d3_zES72HlnNVYrIyzZtCzHSE2VcM9Nx8sMCJxAMlWC0r7m8lYkOo5LuPK9hfE9HcrqIiQONRDXFG_NTdvIhZj8fjg1kK62KIu_SnMGNGFBuEFZp28qq8d0lCmU71Jn6NhZrHnAMdI7Tk-Q_n5bZC9Rb0y6FBUI6NJe1foAP7VZkhOEPw0Bqsg8vvOTdgrZdoaLiOGdoeR9BomdJw==&c=kMH6-Cf3sd9dyWp4HOynzkgU4PzvUdCcshj14ZfgosA91XLCY1KmBQ==&ch=k69lOu9p8eiWKs-MDgNq1YnfO-7GpnicCElC8tb4TQTG_YYYCV-Q1Q==">Households with children make tradeoffs between time and money in their purchases of restaurant meals 
Childcare requires a lot of time, and some households respond to this constraint by cutting back on time spent shopping for food, cooking, and cleaning up afterwards. ERS researchers used data from USDA’s 2012-13 National Household Food Acquisition and Purchase Survey (FoodAPS) to look at the factors that affect demand for convenience and found that households with two children spent 48 percent of their food budgets on restaurant food, while households without children spent only 41 percent. Longer waiting times for food and less child-friendly settings and menu offerings may be among the reasons that households with children spent less on full-service restaurant meals than those without children, regardless of the number of children. As the number of children increases, the monetary cost of eating out seems to outweigh the time savings, especially for households with more than two children. Households with one child spent 37 percent of their food budget on fast food, while households with two children spent 40 percent. The share spent on fast food did not increase after two children.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001HznG-C-AUL4CPvwGm_xC6QDJPS5gcktRdkCnvop1mG1obSZDQ5Io4Q04sZhE4mZWNWQLDymWaIDOv0-HorDs4q7itMTuexElqiv7SoYNN4SpY5HB9OJJKXbMbZ_0ehORire_8dall-pS2K43tc0mT1rHOSfS2ljeXIs2m25kp4ybXzyYtAn44rmil5GCTwt3H70sl7fj2kp1q8j9e50MPkg9hYXRbCi6nTUpo8erDYCNzKwbVPlszxoDSEcH3KugvWDTYdIkxV1_fVCReFhctA==&c=7HDW_CdWlqsdOoUbPoU5OuHQtt34JAAlAAkyKcw8HdNX1P1_RsSk6A==&ch=WeTIRjvj7gM1lPnHKiM9DxeG8l82iMd6ewGqqnrcklRHUPyccNQrWw==">Although farm wages have increased, labor costs as a share of farm gross cash income remained relatively flat 
Farm wages have risen since 2000, reaching an annual average of $13.32 per hour in 2017. However, farm labor costs as a share of farm gross cash income do not show an upward trend over 2000-16, as rising wage rates for farm workers have been offset by a number of factors, including rising labor productivity and output prices for some commodities. For all farms, labor costs averaged 10.1 percent of gross cash income in 2016, compared to 10.6 percent in 2000. For the more labor-intensive fruit, vegetable, and horticulture operations, labor costs in 2016 amounted to 26.7 percent of gross cash income, compared to 28.6 percent in 2000. For farms specializing in dairy, the labor cost share of gross cash income was 10.2 percent in 2016, compared to 9.5 percent in 2000.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001W7kJaUj0NY2pbH2zvQxLCDH7Y3SnnYBbicwpcGHHgULZsiFc5no5Bs-HYEK0MCOtnsekBW1Lp81bQI2Wrw9rnSC1KRj4vJGFAUNH5Vj5EnPXiFSdqSZKtF99VsqI6w7ir8FAH127iBpu6cx-OUMkugVj6sqD9ODvXYWAjr6nhF115xXyWe-G3crrb7MuK6ojkhtkFaW_mUy3zBQSQDZMu6saBre4SCpBT4tH127-bt96OjkwZWbVewogWI4n6KfihMHlL-IdHbKx7H-U9CIIZA==&c=-oQB-orUK-f93B1AJC38oS5dnP7PRz5oeonBnLNX1kjsHB-kkMIpCw==&ch=68m45HlAW6T6cbTrun_ORZdsm5qgMLeyV3rI_QnpmKvpcAwY19jHsA==">Elder veterans tend to reside in rural counties and near military bases 
Veterans constitute a rapidly aging and increasingly diverse group disproportionally living in rural America. Nearly 18 percent of veterans lived in rural (nonmetro) counties in 2015, compared to 15 percent of the U.S. adult civilian population. Veterans were also overrepresented in some rural counties: about 10 percent of all rural civilian adults were veterans, but in some rural counties, that share reached as high as 25 percent. The U.S. counties with the highest shares of veterans tended to have significant concentrations of elder veterans (65 years or older), relative to the Nation as a whole. About 24 percent of all U.S. counties—often completely rural counties not adjacent to metro areas—had concentrations of elder veterans. By comparison, 28 percent of all U.S. counties—predominantly large urban counties (not shown)—contained concentrations of working-age veterans (18 to 65 years old). Areas with concentrations of both groups were mostly in rural counties adjacent to metro areas (19 percent). Many of these counties contained or were near military installations, reserve bases, or training areas.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001k-II0Ue_DbuqvSy6_UDjBZdqAxCEGzsVxFr0YRcvVC9o9staic8z08eRjY5qzzZHAd-weBdIhnEIbXsGZ4hOKqkdZlP7y6nQgA8XKfdqfGCRxmAxZyuALtMpp1HAGxnNYToStx5PpvMoPafBWbsgNFjf0uZp__B5WF475ehNa8k1rOWVX-cQEeW1S7MKI7A8IdA4hemMQfdqDAqsxDcPcsX4v1ESLVfNoVlH3excHtcLAxW0tZ_wXaFVM2pb2BVl-30pHf-jKSA7_stslcLeTA==&c=3R7PSg-m0dEJkfAOrJxecsRKsxvmuhOQl9UrwKwi07WHVGJ6ge_n0A==&ch=D1q2yICyhcxTiZ88_ditR8B0mcvTD5TIgZDFAHEL4YdPgWX_qP4njg==">Expenditures for USDA’s food assistance programs declined in fiscal 2017 
USDA administers 15 domestic food and nutrition assistance programs that together form a nutritional safety net for millions of children and low-income adults. Federal spending on these programs totaled $98.6 billion in fiscal 2017, 4 percent less than the previous fiscal year and almost 10 percent less than the historical high of $109.2 billion set in fiscal 2013. Fiscal 2017’s decline was likely largely due to continued growth in the U.S. economy. Spending for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which accounted for 69 percent of Federal food and nutrition assistance spending in fiscal 2017, totaled $68.0 billion, or 4 percent less than in fiscal 2016 and 15 percent less than the historical high of $79.9 billion set in fiscal 2013. Spending on the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) fell to $5.6 billion in fiscal 2017, 6 percent less than in fiscal 2016. Spending on the three largest child nutrition programs—the National School Lunch Program, the School Breakfast Program, and the Child and Adult Care Food Program—remained about the same.

http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?f=001sqWsvfcsyCJmB3sGHW_C4tHLfKPqf0pAhngJor_5pDrZmDVB0WLzC9Wh-9H1NCoKph-q9zcJQFUqCsefSPzeqgaXOof7RiUQNWiLeuf3nZXeiZ_YlMJa5KDgFMtR6uSzFlP46f-TteF_FD4yJexTbbwCxce8Ezl5yG8GBBPgknHhM1g8uznYX2r7TMTujKitJmO5k1RTYD2voqJh90FkqjJbx03cD7sWhDKPl6GAJmUiolsysd9p-RpuALxo7tkzGHepTpsq8JD2WlF_HeAa4w==&c=c4wp1zPgXdfdMw7j2QbTYVG5pMKEpy1je7QIGqdNNBkpKWgbrovRLA==&ch=NSjDBdmOsC6obQ77XRtxhCQMjRPXBGz8EFYtlxuVe_x0_kRyEOC4LQ==">Food prices less volatile than transportation prices 
The 1970s were a decade of volatile prices for consumers’ top three spending categories—housing, transportation, and food. Annual food price inflation during the 1970s averaged 8.1 percent, and food prices rose by 10 percent or more in 3 of the 10 years. Yearly price changes for housing costs, which include rents, utilities, and household furnishings, averaged 7.6 percent during the decade and peaked at 15.7 percent in 1980. And price changes for transportation (prices of vehicles, gasoline and diesel fuel, and public transportation) topped 10 percent in 1974, 1976, and 1979 and jumped 17.9 percent in 1980. Since that time, prices for food and housing have become comparatively more stable than transportation prices, which continue to be volatile from year to year. Food prices in 2016 and 2017 changed little as decreasing prices for food commodities and energy offset rising costs for other food processing, marketing, and food service inputs. At the same time, a strong U.S. dollar lowered the cost of imported foods.

Events and Learning

First Nations Native Arts Initiative Q&A Webinars| http://org2.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=FsPbrbbihdFZq5F0D4o6PWZ4HDnZmHJ0">August 15, 2018 1PM Mountain Time | http://org2.salsalabs.com/dia/track.jsp?v=2&c=FsPbrbbihdFZq5F0D4o6PWZ4HDnZmHJ0">August 23, 2018 11AM Mountain Time 
First Nations will award about 15 Supporting Native Arts grants of up to $32,000 each to Native-controlled nonprofit organizations and tribal government programs that have existing programs in place that support Native artists and the field of traditional Native arts, as well as a demonstrated commitment to increasing the intergenerational transfer of knowledge of traditional Native artistic practices and perpetuation and proliferation of traditional Native arts. First Nations invites interested applicants to join one or both of the remaining Application Q&A webinars. 

https://www.arc.gov/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=635">"Health in Appalachia" Website Tutorial Webinar 
ARC invites partners and other stakeholders to a webinar about https://healthinappalachia.org/">healthinappalachia.org, a new website that allows users to explore health data in their community and build downloadable reports, maps, and charts on 41 health measures at the county, regional, and state levels for the 13 Appalachian states. The tutorial webinar will be held on Friday, July 27, at 10:00 a.m. ET.

https://rurallisc.cmail20.com/t/r-l-jykdmdk-hikdlkyuih-tj/">Disaster Recovery and Preparation Webinars 
The Rural Community Assistance Corporation (RCAC) is hosting a series of two online webinars on Disaster Preparation and Recovery. The webinars will cover why disasters are important for housing counseling; the potential effects of disasters on communities, agencies and counselors; and the six areas in which housing counseling has played a key role in disaster recovery to help participants gain a broad understanding of the agency disaster preparation and recovery role, including pre-disaster agency planning, identifying and collaborating with key stakeholders, and recognizing opportunities for disaster recovery housing counseling services. The webinars will take place on September 11 and September 13, 2018 from 1:00 to 3:00 PM EDT.

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_sy58DHhDSA6Tz4tNWDhFzg">Cooperatives and Business Succession Strategies | July 19, 2018.  Time: 12 - 1 p.m. CDT. 
Over the next two decades, an estimated 70% of privately held businesses will change hands, many as a result of retiring baby boomers. Who will take over these businesses, and will they remain in their communities?  This webinar will look at the conversion of businesses to cooperatives owned by the employees as one effective method for retaining businesses, jobs, and wealth in local communities.  This webinar is the third in a series that explores cooperative solutions to challenges in rural and urban communities.

  • Cooperatives and Community Infrastructure Needs: September 19, 2018 
  • Cooperatives and Community-Owned Businesses: October 17, 2018 
  • All webinars will be held at 12:00 pm to 1:00 pm Central Time.

  

promisetag

Our FB Feed